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Lisa67

equivalence of names

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Lisa67

TNG-12

Hi, is there an opportunity to make name equivalences. Example: KIHM - KIM - KEM - KEEM

For this family name I have only 4 equivalences, but I have other surnames or there are more. It is important to see generation after generation the modification of the spelling and especially when there is emigration to the USA.

I have SCHAUER in Alsace (France) who became SHOWER in the USA, it's the same pronunciation but not the same spelling

Thanks, Lisa

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Newfloridian

Hi Lisa

Common issue. I tend to standardise on the commonmost spelling of the surname for continuity and note variations where they occur either in the alias or aka field or in the notes field. In my experience particularly in rural Victorian England it was often the recorder who wrote down what he thought he heard and the subject not being able to read or write being unable to correct it. Regional accents didn't help either. Example: one family in consecutive censuses and birth registrations spelled Crane, Crain, Crayne and Craine.

Alan 

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manofmull

Lisa

"equivalences" is a big word: I've been using "variant" or "alias" for years (I know "alias" can be another name completely).

Like Alan, I standardise using the most common spelling but I also add the "variant/alias" in brackets/parenthesis.

For the French example you give, I would display this as SHOWER (SCHAUER).

One name on my website has at least twelve variations, so I opted for MCGILVRAY. Variants include MCGILVARY/MCGILVERY/MCGILLIVRAY etc....(a nightmare without standardisation). The law in Scotland was exactly as Alan described in England i.e. ANY spelling was legal, so long as it SOUNDED as intended.

 

Michael

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Katryne

Hello !

I still cannot decide whether I enter the standardized/modern family name or the version as written in the documents. According to my mood of the day, I can choose either way, forgetting the good decisions of the previous day. Which makes my trees a mess and regularly, I spend some time regularizing the writing of family names. And the given names too.

What I think should be done is choosing a modernized (official ?) version of the family name for everybody and entering the different variations in the alias field. I don't like using brackets, because I may find altogether half a dozen versions of the name.  And I do not like modernizing given names either. The parents called the girl Martgo and not Marguerite, Magdalene and not Madeleine ...

But each story is a special case.  In France, it has benn forbiden to change the family name since 1474. Since 1539, official documents must be written in French and registration is compulsory for baptisms, marriages and deaths. The 1794  law prohibits the use of surnames and forenames other than those registered in the civil registry. In 1877, the creation of the family booklet fixed the spelling of surnames.

But in Provence (South East of France), I find documents in the 17th century and up to 1760, written in a mixture of latin and Provençal (local language). The girl family name is often feminized (Vidale daughter of Vidal, Guérine, daughter of Guérin, Ripelle, daughter of Ripert ...) even if the law says otherwise. ... I tell you, I know what should be done, but I never follow the rules. Neither did our forefathers...

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Newfloridian

I guess this is probably more a matter of presentation - which can be difficult in a flat system like a tree chart or a single person's display page. I have always been a family historian rather than a genealogist so when this type of issue involves a family interlinked with mine and which also has elements of interest or intrigue in their generations I will use TNG's Feature Article facility to generate an illustrated and referenced article about them. 

One such example (and I now have over 500 on site) is the case of the Liquorish family. I standardised on that spelling for my text (even though there were many recurrent changes of spelling in the various documents) but added the following explanatory footnote: "A Lexicon Of Liquorish": The family surname has shown a surfeit of different spellings over the centuries, even within the lilfetime of a single individual. To aid the flow of the narrative, we have standardised on "Liquorish" throughout this article. Other known variations include Licquorish, Licqurish, Licorish, Liquorice, Lickerice, Lickerish, Lickorish, Lickrish

If of interest, you can see the full article here (the title was an obvious play on words!):

 The Gretton Craxfords: Exodus II - All sorts of Liquorish

Alan

 

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manofmull

Alan

Very witty = Liquorice All-Sorts (a sweet/candy). Note my own choice of spelling for that word.

 

M

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Lisa67

Most French software has equivalence tables, which facilitates the work. The laws are one thing, the practice another, in Alsace, it is according to the pastor or the secretary of town hall, the spelling changes .... Sorry for my English I'm French. one exemple of my french genealogy program

Equivalence.jpg

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